Friday, June 24, 2016

Knowing the Signs of Heat Exhaustion in Your Dogs


 
The following is a “pass along” newsletter article from the Pointing Dog Journal originally published 7/28/2011.

Heat Exhaustion in Dogs:
Signs to Look For and How to Prevent It 

Pass Along PDJ Heat Exhaustion
By Jill Swan

Now that summer is upon us, things are heating up, which can cause our sporting dogs to overheat during training if precautions are not taken. Keeping your dog cool and watching for signs of heat exhaustion — after all, they have a difficult time holding back and saying no — are just as important as the lessons you’re teaching during your outdoor sessions. Heat exhaustion, simply put, is when the body gets overheated from working (exercising) in hot, humid temperatures. To gain better insight, we’ll rely on the expertise of veterinary associates Drs. Peter Lotsikas and Chris Zink of Veterinary Orthoperdic & Sports Medicine Group in Annapolis Junction, Maryland.

What are some of the signs?
Humans regulate their body temperature primarily through the skin, such as sweating. But “dogs do not sweat like humans, and the majority of their cooling ability comes from the respiratory system,” says Drs. Peter Lotsikas and Chris Zink. “Dogs will initially start to pant and salivate when they become hot. The evaporation of the saliva from their tongue, mouth, and throat removes heat from the body.”

What can I do to help prevent heat exhaustion?
Coat and coat care — The thickness of your dog’s coat is also something to consider as dogs do use their skin for heat exchange. According to our docs, “A dog’s fur traps air, just like birds, which acts as an insulator when it is cold as well as when it is hot outside. This allows dilated blood vessels to exchange heat with the ‘trapped’ cooler air in the fur. A dog’s ability to trap insulating air will differ based on breed type and coat characteristics. Short haired breeds do not have the ability to trap air within their coat, thus these breeds are more susceptible to overheating than are double coated breeds like retrievers. Keeping short haired dogs wet during training and heavy exercise is an effective way to keep them cool. As the water evaporates, heat is removed with it.

“For a double coated or long single coated breed, you are better off only wetting the groin and abdominal areas, where the skin is thin and poorly haired, to allow for heat excha nge. Wetting the back of these dogs actually traps water in the coat, and as this trapped water begins to vaporize it will increase the humidity around the skin, actually making the dog hotter.” To better help the trapping of air, keep your dog’s coat well-groomed and clean.

Physical shape — And of course, make certain that your dog is in good training condition. Dogs not used to heavy training or working on a regular basis outside will be effected more quickly. “A conditioned dog’s temperature should regulate to normal (99.5-102.5) within twenty minutes of cooling. Any temperature of above 105 persisting longer than thirty minutes following appropriate cooling requires the attention of a veterinary professional.”

Water — Make sure to offer your dog plenty of cool water intermittently during your training sessions, and make sure he drinks some. “Remember that dogs do not need to drink large amounts of water in hot weather as we do, because they do not become dehydrated from sweating. Many dogs do not drink substantial amounts on performance days and it is not a problem,” says Drs. Peter Lotsikas and Chris Zink. The important thing is that the coolness of the liquid will cool down the core body temperature of the dog.


What can I do if my dog becomes overheated?

Hopefully the situation never escalates to that level, but if you are seeing signs that your dog is overheated, then you need to immerse the dog in cool water. Don’t use ice water because it constricts the blood vessels and can actually increase the dog’s core body temperature. “If water is limited, then you are best to apply the water directly to the belly, armpits, and groin,” advises Drs. Peter Lotsikas and Chris Zink. They also recommend rubbing alcohol: “It can be applied to their paw pads, external ear flaps, and abdomen, as it evaporates quickly and is an effective method of exchanging heat.”

Doctor Bios
Dr. Peter Lotsikas, DVM is an ACVS board-certified surgeon with the Veterinary Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Group (VOSM) in Annapolis Junction, Maryland. Dr. Lotsikas specializes in orthopedic injuries of the performance dog. His clinical focus is on minimally invasive surgery (arthroscopy) and joint preservation.

Dr. M. Christine Zink DVM, Ph.D, DACVP is a canine sports medicine trainer affiliated with VOSM. Her expertise is in evaluating canine locomotion and designing individualized retraining and conditioning programs for the canine athlete.



Friday's Funnies!

Off the Leash

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Tips for Introducing Two Dogs for the First Time!

Taking the time to make a proper introduction is key to creating harmony when you bring a new dog into your home.  Macie and Cindel have clearly been introduced with great results!
How to Introduce Two Dogs for the First Time

There are many tips to help you introduce your new dog to other resident dogs or other dogs they may encounter, and all of these methods require patience and consistency, as well as a solid understanding of dog body language.

Mary Hirt of Teacher’s Pet K9 in West Los Angeles, California, gives a great demonstration of making the Introduction, with a clear explanation of why her method works.  The dogs in the video are clearly not Cairn, but you can easily visualize your Cairns as you watch this step-by-step introduction.



Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Wacky Wednesday!



Wednesday is the day to be WACKY!  Each week we will showcase a terrierific Cairn picture with an appropriate caption.  If you would like us to consider YOUR picture and caption for an upcoming "Wacky Wednesday" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com!  All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.

A big shout out to Corkie for being our Wacky Wednesday model this week!




Sunday, June 19, 2016

Sunday Sweets!

Sunday is full of SWEETS!  Each week we will showcase the sweeter side of Cairns.  If you have a sweet filled Cairn and would like us to consider YOUR picture for an upcoming "Sunday Sweets!" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.).

Foster Arsenio

Foster Trapper John

Foster Lafitte

BoBo

Diana fka CP Lurline Diane

Cami fka CP Calamity Jane

Tristan fka CP Holmes

Foster Beauregard

Candy

Foster Sandor

Foster Tamar

Foster Cherie Amour

KoKo Blue fka CP Caitrin

Miss Macie Enjoying a Walk!












Friday, June 17, 2016

Looking at the World Through Your Cairn's Eyes

What does your Cairn see when he looks at his world?


"…There is also a meeting point where the differences between us disappear, and we are all in balance, comfortable, in agreement, and at peace..."    Suzanne Clothier

Perspectives

Looking at the world through your dog’s eyes.

My friend Joe Steinfeld said it best: "It seems to me that the main difference between humans and other species is that we are always looking for the difference between humans and other species."

Life at the farm is shared with many different species, which means on any given day, we're considering life from many perspectives.  We’re hot and sweaty?  The parrot and the tortoises are enjoying the perfect weather.  We need jackets?  Our Scottish Highland cattle are delightedly kicking up their heels in the brisk air.

Viewed through the perspective of our animals, how different life looks, feels, smells - and is.  We seek to understand the differences so that we can minimize our animals' stress, and maximize their comfort and joy.  It stretches us, this daily need to consider how others view their world.

But there is also a meeting point where the differences between us disappear, and we are all in balance, comfortable, in agreement and at peace.  This is the place we seek daily:  Where we are together in a life shared, despite the differences.


"Copyright © 2013 by Suzanne Clothier. Used by permission of Suzanne Clothier. All rights reserved. For more information about Suzanne please visit SuzanneClothier.com"

Read More Training Tips from Suzanne Clothier:


Friday's Funnies!

Off the Leash

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Teaching Your Cairn Self Control


"Teaching your dog self control is the foundation for all other learning...  Self control must be taught, just as you teach him to sit or speak or come when called."    Suzanne Clothier

Guidelines for Teaching Self Control

Does your dog pull on lead when someone approaches?  When he sees another dog? If joggers run by?  If children are playing?  If a cat or squirrel dash through the yard?  Is he hard to control at the vet's or groomer's?  When people come into your house?

If the answer to any of these questions is “Yes”, chances are your dog needs to learn self control.  Just as children must learn to control their impulses before they can mature into responsible adults, dogs must learn self control before they can become well mannered canine citizens.  Self control must be taught, just as you teach him to sit or speak or come when called.

Every owner can teach his dog self control by following these guidelines: 

Train, don't restrain. Taking a firm grip on the leash and collar teaches the dog nothing except that you can restrain him.  Instead, give a simple command, such as “Sit”, reminding with the lead if needed, then loosen the lead so there is no tension at all.  If the dog breaks position, quietly and slowly reposition him, and loosen the lead again. 

Ask for compliance, not submission.  View working with your dog as you would working with any friend.  Avoid creating a struggle by asking the dog for more than he can do at the time.  For example, if your dog is really excited, he may be unable or unwilling to lay down, but agreeable to sitting quietly with a few reminders from you.  Compromise and be reasonable - most struggles between dog and owner are created when the owner attempts to dominate the dog, instead of finding a solution acceptable to both owner and dog. 

Remember the dog does not know what his options are.  A dog who is lacking self control simply does not know that it is possible to sit quietly in the face of distractions.  It is the owner's responsibility to show the dog that he has options other than lunging, pulling or leaping around. 

Move slowly and talk quietly.  A dog who is highly excited needs calm, slow handling.  A common mistake owners make is to move quickly, grabbing at the leash and collar, raising their voice and speaking in short, sharp tones.  From the dog's point of view, the owner appears as excited as they are, and short sharp tones often sound like barking.  Instead of calming the dog, this reinforces his excitement.  By moving slowly and talking quietly, the owner sends a clear message to the dog that he is not excited and is in control of the situation. 

Remind and ask, don't demand.  A dog who is already excited is likely to resist a harsh correction or respond by becoming more excited.  "Ask" by using the lightest possible touch on the leash and collar, and remind the dog what he's doing each time he forgets and shifts position. 

Work on teaching self control in all situations.  Begin by working in distraction free areas, and ask your dog to sit on a loose leash for five minutes.  Gradually move on to more exciting situations, and practice often.  Work at home, at friends' homes, in parks, shopping centers, at dog shows, training classes and the veterinarian's.  As your dog's self control and respect for you increases, you can add laying down quietly for up to 30 minutes to his skills.

For more information, we recommend the Flying Dog Press booklet - Understanding & Teaching Self Control.

"Copyright © 2013 by Suzanne Clothier. Used by permission of Suzanne Clothier. All rights reserved. For more information about Suzanne please visit SuzanneClothier.com"














Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Wacky Wednesday!



Wednesday is the day to be WACKY!  Each week we will showcase a terrierific Cairn picture with an appropriate caption.  If you would like us to consider YOUR picture and caption for an upcoming "Wacky Wednesday" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com!  All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.

A big shout out to Foster Burnell and Ronnie fka CP Ron K for being our Wacky Wednesday model this week!




Sunday, June 12, 2016

Sunday Sweets!

Sunday is full of SWEETS!  Each week we will showcase the sweeter side of Cairns.  If you have a sweet filled Cairn and would like us to consider YOUR picture for an upcoming "Sunday Sweets!" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.).

Foster Red Rover

Caruso, Macie, and Cindel

Foster Chiquita

Foster Lafitte

Sheamus

Foster Jimmie E

Reggie fka CP Lil Wrangler

Baby D

Sophie

Carver

Wally fka CP Jennings

Terence

Tess

Hoku fka CP Boden

Tristan fka CP Holmes

Ty, Supervising his Personal Fitness Coach








Friday, June 10, 2016

Keeping Your Cairns Safe from Ticks and the Pain of Lyme Disease

Contributed by a CP Volunteer

Understand all your options to protect your Best Friends from ticks!


Now is the time to start thinking about keeping your Best Friends safe from the host of diseases carried by the insidious little tick.  Planning ahead - before the grass starts to grow - might be the best approach to a more enjoyable Spring, Summer, and Fall with your dog!

First, look around your yard for areas that need to be tidied up.  Ticks like tall grasses, low bushes, and yard debris, so identify any areas of concern. 

  • Cut your grass short and plan to keep it short.  There are fabulous new dwarf grasses you might consider introducing to your lawn to help in this regard and eventually reduce the work.

  • If possible, create a 6-foot wide edge between your active lawn and any taller grass, plants, or bushes.  Cedar mulch is great, except if you have a dog that likes to nibble on yard materials.  Better to use stone or a concrete walk.  Ticks may be in the taller grass, but they will not cross a barrier of this nature.

  • Purchase food quality Diatomaceous Earth (DE) and sprinkle it around the perimeter and all over your yard, in the gardens, and along the foundation of your home.  DE is a powdery substance made from tiny fossilized water plants. The tiny particles have sharp edges that cut and destroy flea eggs, dry out adult insects' protective outer coating, and shred their insides if ingested.  It is very effective in ridding your yard of ticks!  Treating your yard with DE is an excellent preventative measure and can be done once or twice annually, depending on several environmental variables.  Just be sure to use food grade DE.

  • Look for natural products to kill or ward off fleas and ticks, but always keep in mind the safety of your dog when using any pesticide, natural or otherwise.

Seems like a lot of bother, but it is well worth it.

Lyme disease is a horrible disease spread by ticks, causing widespread joint and tissue pain and more.  Worse than that, it can seemingly cause an otherwise wonderful little dog to become a raging, aggressive monster, with no rhyme or reason.  If the Lyme Disease is undetected, the dog will very likely be destroyed when the proper course of antibiotics would have cleared the problem completely.

If you do find that your dog has somehow contracted Lyme disease, it is very important to get it treated aggressively.  Doxycycline should be given for a period of 8 weeks, at twice the recommended level, and a C6 Quantative Analysis by Idexx should be done at the time the Lyme is diagnosed, and then again six months after treatment to see if the levels of antibodies go down by at least 50%.

If not, the dog should be treated again, same as above.  Lyme disease is a serious disease and should be treated aggressively.  Treating as recommended in the Merck manual may leave an animal partially cured, but with enough antibodies in their blood that it can recur, which is then called a "flare-up".  Each time a flare-up occurs, it is harder to stop or contain it.  

The vets on the Tick list recommend the dog be treated with doxy at twice the rate in the Merck manual and for 8 weeks rather than 4.



Friday's Funnies!

Off the Leash

Thursday, June 9, 2016

The A B Cs of Lyme Disease

Contributed by a CP Volunteer


Understanding Lyme Disease will help you and your Cairn enjoy the great outdoors.

You may never see a tick on your dog, and you may never miss an application of Frontline or other preventative, but it is wise to be aware of the signs and symptoms of Lyme Disease so quick and effective action can be taken if necessary.

Lyme disease is a horrible disease spread by ticks, causing widespread joint and tissue pain and more.  Your dog may start limping or reacting to touch.  Worse than that, Lyme disease can seemingly cause an otherwise wonderful little dog to become a raging, aggressive monster, with no rhyme or reason.  If the Lyme Disease is undetected, the dog will very likely be destroyed when, tragically, the proper course of antibiotics would have cleared the problem completely.

If you do find that your dog has somehow contracted Lyme disease, it is very important to get it treated aggressively.  Doxycycline should be given for a period of 8 weeks, at twice the recommended level, and a C6 Quantative Analysis by Idexx should be done at the time the Lyme is diagnosed, and then again six months after treatment to see if the levels of antibodies go down by at least 50%.

If not, the dog should be treated again, same as above.  Lyme disease is a serious disease and should be treated aggressively.  Treating as recommended in the Merck manual may leave an animal partially cured, but with enough antibodies in their blood that it can recur, which is then called a "flare-up".  Each time a flare-up occurs, it is harder to stop or contain it.  

The vets on the Tick list recommend the dog be treated with doxy at twice the rate in the Merck manual and for 8 weeks rather than 4.

Join the Tick-L (tick list) at:


Many of us have been shoveling snow for a month or so already, even though it is not even Winter yet!  Now is the time to start thinking about keeping your best friends safe from the host of diseases carried by the insidious little tick.  Planning ahead - long before the grass starts to grow - might be the best approach to a more enjoyable Spring, Summer, and Fall with your dog!  Even after a brutally cold Winter, a single warm day in late Winter will bring the ticks back to life.

First, look around your yard for areas that need to be tidied up.  Ticks like tall grasses, low bushes, and yard debris, so identify any areas of concern. 

  • Cut your grass short and plan to keep it short.  There are fabulous new dwarf grasses you might consider introducing to your lawn to help in this regard and eventually reduce the work.

  • If possible, create a 6-foot wide edge between your active lawn and any taller grass, plants, or bushes.  Cedar mulch is great, except if you have a dog that likes to nibble on yard materials.  Better to use stone or a concrete walk.  Ticks may be in the taller grass, but they will not cross a barrier of this nature.

  • Purchase food quality Diatomaceous Earth (DE) and sprinkle it around the perimeter and all over your yard, in the gardens, and along the foundation of your home.  DE is a powdery substance made from tiny fossilized water plants. The tiny particles have sharp edges that cut and destroy flea eggs, dry out adult insects' protective outer coating, and shred their insides if ingested.  It is very effective in ridding your yard of ticks!  Treating your yard with DE is an excellent preventative measure and can be done once or twice annually, depending on several environmental variables.  Just be sure to use food grade DE.

  • Look for natural products to kill or ward off fleas and ticks, but always keep in mind the safety of your dog when using any pesticide, natural or otherwise.

Seems like a lot of bother, but it is well worth it!

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Wacky Wednesday!



Wednesday is the day to be WACKY!  Each week we will showcase a terrierific Cairn picture with an appropriate caption.  If you would like us to consider YOUR picture and caption for an upcoming "Wacky Wednesday" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com!  All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.

A big shout out to Caruso and Macie for being our Wacky Wednesday model this week - and a Happy 6th Birthday to Caruso!!!




Sunday, June 5, 2016

Sunday Sweets!

Sunday is full of SWEETS!  Each week we will showcase the sweeter side of Cairns.  If you have a sweet filled Cairn and would like us to consider YOUR picture for an upcoming "Sunday Sweets!" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.).

Foster Polly Ann

Caruso

Sweet Concetta

Foster Creole

Fritz

Sweet Napoleon

Medinah

Miss Macie

Murphy and Riley

Maggie

Foster Trapper John

Foster Tamar

Maxwell

Louie

Meatloaf, Tori, and Duffy