Friday, December 15, 2017

Friday Flashback: Conor Takes the Cake!

Written by Conor fka CP Hubble
Originally posted 5/30/2014 on the Post Adoption Blog

Conor fka CP Hubble has a new Favorite toy!

Well, Hello There!  Conor here, though you probably remember me as CP Hubble – yes the one who hopped over the fence in the deep snow (That was fun! He-he-he-he!) and made my Foster Mom think I got “lost” for a bit.   I knew where I was, so I wasn’t really lost - I just wanted to see what it would be like, living in a different home, that’s all.  Well, I can tell you now: there’s no more fence hopping in my future!  I’ve found the most Perfect Forever Home and the most Wonderful Forever Dad so I’m putting down roots right here!

Conor has had a smile on his face…
…since he first looked into Dad’s eyes!
My Dad and I live near a college campus and we love to go there for walks and to meet all kinds of people - and get fussed over by all the college kids!  I also made friends with the security officers at the college.  They usually come out of their office when they see us walking on their monitors, but if they don’t show up, I go to their office door to see where they are.

Conor and Dad give Day Care a try…
…and it turns out to be Fun!


Dad took me to try out a place called “DayCare” so I could meet and play with some new dog friends.  It was lots of fun!!! We had a game of “Bobbing for Hotdogs”, and we had a birthday party for one of the dogs, and I made good friends with a Beagle!  I made friends pretty easily with other dogs, but they kept reminding me to “curb my excitement” - whatever that means!  Dad liked looking at the pictures they took while I was there, and he said we can go back again every week!  I hope my Beagle friend comes back too!

Dad was very impressed when I showed him my super prey drive and Spiderman skills.  I literally climbed up the bark of an oak tree in pursuit of a squirrel!  Dad had me on the leash so I didn’t get very far, but far enough to show Dad my true Cairnacity!  He had never had a Cairn climb a tree before, so I was glad to give him a good demonstration!

Those Canadian Geese are another story, however. I kept watching them carefully while they were grazing on the athletic fields, and I decided they were making too much of a mess.  The next time there was a large group of geese, I took action!  I used my deep bark and stood on my hind legs and barked at them.  That did the trick!  The geese took off and I felt so full of power!  Of course, when they flew above us, they let loose a fleet-load of goose-poop and I was completely astonished!  I never saw anything like it, falling out of the sky!  Thankfully, none of it hit me, but my Dad wasn’t quite so lucky…  Well, now I start looking for those nasty geese when we walk throughout the campus, and if they are flying above, I stand on my hind legs and give them a piece of my mind!  Dad wears a hat now, just in case…

Conor “flocks” Dad for a Birthday Surprise (note the hat!!)
On Dad’s birthday, I had him "flocked" at 6:30 A.M. when we went out for our walk – Surprise!!  I was pretty sure being greeted by 20 plastic flamingos was better than those old geese!  I even went crazy barking at them, and they did not make a mess.  It was a good surprise – better than cake!

My Dad says that I have a “wonderful personality” and that my behavior is great.  I think he likes that I’m so affectionate and love to sit on his lap while he’s reading or working on the computer.  I’m also very willing to go in my crate and have a little quiet time when Dad is busy.

Of course, Dad isn’t always on the ball…  One morning he had placed his bagel on the kitchen counter when the phone rang and he had to go in a different room to find the portable phone.  When he got back, the bagel was mysteriously gone.  He looked to see if he had put it into the toaster, but it was no where to be found.  Well, later that night, while Dad and I were sitting in the TV room, he noticed that I would disappear for a while and then come back with crumbs around my mouth…  Well, a thorough search revealed pieces of bagel tucked between couch pillows, under Dad’s bed pillow, in the back of my crate, and a few other strategic locations…  For some reason, Dad doesn’t leave food on the kitchen counter anymore when I’m around!

Dad hosted a big gathering over Easter with family and friends, and he worried about me being a bit overwhelmed, but it all worked out!  I went from person to person and jumped to give them kisses, and once I jumped into one person’s lap and sat with him for awhile.  I showed Dad that I was really a good boy!  There was that one time when I really wanted to take the stuffed bunny from that three year old, but I traded it pretty quickly for some new toys of my own.  Even when the three year old kept trying to pick me up (and then drop me!), I was very good and just figured out how to avoid her.  After everyone left, we were happy to get back into our routine!  We took our walk then I just jumped up on Dad’s lap and we both fell asleep in the recliner - A perfect way to end the day!

Thank you to all of the great Volunteers at Col. Potter who gave me a chance to be Happy Forever with the Greatest Dad in the World!


Read my CP Intake Story:

Friday Funnies!

Off the Leash
Note: Click on the image to enlarge!



Thursday, December 14, 2017

Correcting Submissive Urination!

Making a few simple adjustments in your daily routines can give your dog confidence and correct unwanted behaviors.


Submissive urination happens when a dog is lacking in confidence and eliminates upon greeting as a doggie way of saying, “I’m deferring to you, please don’t hurt me!”  There is usually a genetic component at play (i.e., the dog has a softer, less confident temperament), but this issue is almost always exacerbated by punishment.  Even a mild verbal reprimand can be enough to send some dogs down a worrisome slippery slope.



Don’t Punish Your Dog


Often, what people are punishing a dog for is not what the dog thinks he is being punished for.  For example, if you come home to find a piddle and reprimand your pup, you may think you are teaching him about housetraining, but the dog may actually be learning that people coming home or walking up to him is scary.



Don’t Comfort Your Dog


Comforting words, however well intended, will reinforce any undesirable behavior and make it worse.  It is best to say absolutely nothing or to start talking about something neutral – sports, the weather, etc. – so your tone of voice and cadence is perfectly calm and confident.



Simple Tips to Halt Submissive Urination



1. Refrain from verbal or physical reprimands of any sort.



2. Teach your dog to have a new emotional response to the situation.  Ask your dog to “Sit” before greeting you or another person and offer a high value treat from your hand.



3. At the same time, you should practice teaching your dog to hand target and then transfer this skill to others once your dog is doing it confidently with you.  A dog who knows how to greet by confidently touching a hand to say “Hi” is far less inclined to submissively urinate.



4. Work with your dog to give it confidence, teaching commands and engaging in walking and other activities that are positive and burn off any anxious energy.  A confident dog will not engage in submissive peeing.



Andrea Arden, CPDT
Andrea Arden Dog Training
New York, NY

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Wacky Wednesday!


Note: Click on the image to enlarge!
Wednesday is the day to be WACKY!  Each week we will showcase a terrierific Cairn picture with an appropriate caption.  If you would like us to consider YOUR picture and caption for an upcoming "Wacky Wednesday" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com!  All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.

A big shout out to Gabby, Rocky, and Tess for being our Wacky Wednesday models this week!



Sunday, December 10, 2017

Sunday Sweets!

Sunday is full of SWEETS!  Each week we showcase the sweeter side of Cairns.  If you have a sweet filled Cairn and would like us to consider YOUR photo for an upcoming "Sunday Sweets!" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.).


Macie

Foster Squeek

Foster Barrett Bear

Fergie

Foster Chaco

Foster Steve

Tai fna CP Taiwan

Charlie and CP Nellie Mae

Foster Nash

Foster Melly

Foster Giancarlo

Rodney


Saturday, December 9, 2017

Not Too Late to get Great Christmas Decorations!

Please Feel Free to Cross Post!

Lynch Creek Farm is pleased to partner with Col. Potter again to bring you a special Fundraiser Campaign Col.Potter Cairn Rescue Network Giving Green!  Now through Sunday, December 10th, you can order any beautiful, high quality wreath, centerpiece, or other decorative item for the Holidays, as a Gift, or for your own home, and Lynch Creek Farm will donate a full 20% of your purchase to Col. Potter to help save another Cairn in need!  You can order now for December delivery, easy as 1.2.3!  Not ready to shop?  You can make a straight-up donation via the Lynch Creek Farm campaign and 100% of all donations will go to the Cairns!  100%!!!  A fantastic opportunity to donate or to give a gift that gives twice!

Lynch Creek Farm Presents
Now - December 10th
20% of all proceeds and 100% of all donations
during this time will be sent to

Check out some of our Sunday Sweets Favorites, featuring many Rescued Cairns and friends who have been helped by the generosity and hard work of so many Col. Potter Volunteers - the best gift in any season!



Please Feel Free to Cross Post!

 

 

Friday, December 8, 2017

Friday Flashback: Charlie Catches Spring Fever!

Written by Charlie aka Chuckles fka CP Sir. Charlie
Originally posted 6/6/2014 on the Post Adoption Blog

Charlie fka CP Sir. Charlie - still Happy in Forever!

Hey, Col. Potter people!   It’s finally Spring! 

You might remember me from a few months back (eight, if you want to be precise…) as that charming older gentleman, Sir. Charlie, adopted by another charming older gentleman, my Dad!  He dropped the “Sir.” As it was just too formal for us country folk, so now I am simply Charlie – but I am still Charming!
Do you like this profile better?
A nice lady named “Janet” came over and took some photos of me – and fell in love with me, of course!  (I am charming, after all…)

I like to take my Dad for a walk…

…and Dad likes to check out the other animals!

Anyway, my Dad calls me “Chuckles” because I make him laugh every day, and that’s a good thing too.  He, in turn, takes me for nice walks every day, and I let him stop and check out the pesky alpaca (who is just a stick in the mud as far as I’m concerned), and he likes to stop and make sure the cattle are keeping the grass short enough (especially with the ticks!).
I love the Spring!
 
Dad calls me “Chuckles” because I make him laugh!
I then always treat him to my "stop, drop, and roll" routine which makes him laugh.  I like to keep him happy!  Happy Dad!  Happy Charlie!  Simple as that!

Well, that’s it for now, but I’ll let you know how things are going down the road.  Now…  Where did we leave that pesky alpaca?











Friday Funnies!

Off the Leash
Note: Click on the image to enlarge!



Thursday, December 7, 2017

Col. Potter Training Tips: Understanding and Managing Resource Guarding!

Resource Guarding is a natural instinct, brought on by anxiety, especially in a dog who is under-confident about other things in his life.  The very best course of action is to avoid situations that threaten the dog and its possessions.  Allow your dog to chew in peace when appropriate and never try and take the toy away except as part of a positive exchange.

Resource Guarding

What is resource guarding?

Resource guarding (RG) is when a dog has possession of an object that he/she thinks is valuable, and is growling/snapping/biting in an effort to protect/keep that object.  

The object may be something we deem silly, for example, a piece of Kleenex is a common object dogs guard...or even empty bowls.  Some dogs will even guard spots, like a bed or couch.  And in few, rarer cases dogs will see their owner is a resource and guard that person.
 
Why does my dog do this?

Generally speaking, RG is a genetic, inborn behavior.  This behavior evolved because in the wild, possession of something is important, and not allowing that thing to be stolen is a matter of life and death.  Many dogs retain this behavior, despite there being ample resources.  Just like hunting, playing, and mating, RG is a survival skill built into the dog.

In some cases, RG can be learned.  This happens most often when a bored dog starts to chew objects.  The owner approaches and removes the object, often times scolding the dog.  Unfortunately, this only teaches the dog to steal/chew objects out of the owner’s sight to avoid punishment, and/OR it will teach him that he needs to protect the object from the owner, as he sees the owner as a thief.
 
Things like anxiety, being in a new home, or the addition of another dog or pet can increase these behaviors, or cause them to appear seemingly spontaneously.  Dogs that are under-confident in other aspects of their lives tend to be guarders.


This puppy is at the first level of warning, freezing in place and giving a hard stare, his paw on his toy, because his Alpha sister is standing right there, ready to jump in and grab his special toy.  Know the signs so you can avoid trouble!  The timely distraction of a training session, with “sits” and “downs” and great treats, avoided further escalation in this case.

What’s with all the biting, snapping, growling?

These behaviors are part of the dogs hierarchy of warnings.  The warnings play out like this:

  • Freezing in place/hard staring
  • Placing face against the object, putting more paws on the object
  • Lip lifting
  • Growling
  • Warning/air snapping (these will not make contact)
  • Warning snaps with contact (does not break skin)
  • Biting that breaks skin
  • Full attack fight that must be broken up.

Generally speaking, most dogs will travel up the hierarchy, over time, giving stronger and stronger warnings, until they finally end up biting or attacking.  Now, how hard the dog bites, depends on his learned bite inhibition.  Bite inhibition is learned as a puppy from littermates, and from his owners when he comes home.  If a dog has good bite inhibition, he will be very restrained in his bites, if he has poor control, he may bite very hard, and sooner than a dog with better control.

Some dogs go up this hierarchy, gradually, over time.  For example a dog being pestered by another dog while he eats may progress over weeks or months until they finally fight, but other dogs may go up the warning hierarchy VERY quickly - so quickly that they run through all the signals in a blink of an eye.  These are the types of dogs that many people site as “biting without warning".  What actually is happening is perhaps the owner did not see the signals, or chose to ignore or punish the lower level signals.

The point being, dogs do not want to attack over their object, they want to do everything possible to keep their object, but without causing harm, this is ritualized aggression.  Its when the issue is pushed (for example a human that continues to take objects away despite warnings, or another dog that continues to bully the RG) the dog's behavior can, and usually does, escalate.
 
Should I use corrections to stop this?
Isn't my dog trying to dominant me?

Dogs that RG are not trying to climb a social ladder, or overthrow the humans as the "leader".  In fact, these are the dogs in the household with confidence or anxiety issues. These are dogs that are, in a sense, "paranoid" that everyone is out to get their "valued thing".  Confident dogs do not feel the need to RG most objects, as they are positive no one is even going to try to take their stuff.
 
However, most "normal" dogs, with average to high confidence, may guard something of very high value - like a piece of raw meat, a new toy, etc. - when the dog doesn't normally get to have those things.  It is the abnormally high value of the object that elicits the behavior.
 
Strangers can also create the behavior.  A dog that would never RG from the family may snap at a guest, the anxiety from not knowing the person as well triggers the behavior.  Or, in the case of a party or gathering at the house, the dog may simply be over-stimulated.

Corrections for this behavior, such as yelling at the dog, making hissing sounds, physically punishing the dog, poking him, or removing the object as punishment are all methods with a very high likelihood of backfiring, plus making the behavior worse.  Since this is often anxiety based, punishment will only increase anxiety, and also damage your relationship with your dog.  It puts you two in conflict every time he finds an object he likes.

What should I do first?

First, we want to manage (prevent) the behavior as much as possible.  Pick up your clothes and things, remove dog toys and treats from the floor, moving and covering trashcans, and so forth.  Use x-pens and baby gates to keep your dog out of areas where he is going to find objects to guard.
 
The reason this is so important is that every time the dog practices the behavior, it is becoming more and more ingrained.  Preventing it helps keep the dog at the level he/she is already at, while you implement training.  If the dog guards food/food bowls, feed him separately from other dogs, preferably in his own room or crate.
 
For dogs that guard food bowls/food management:
 
If the dog is being aggressive with humans, one of the best things you can start is hand-feeding ALL meals.  Many dogs do not make the connection that food comes from YOU, and instead think it magically appears in their magic bowl (hence guarding an empty bowl).
 
Couch/bed guarding management:

Attaching a short leash to help guide the dog off the spot will work in an emergency, but placing cardboard boxes or other objects on the surface that discourage usage is preferred.  Also remember to close doors or use baby gates to keep the dog away from the surface they guard.

Make sure to discuss the management plan with all family members so that everyone is on board and there is a better chance of success.

Ok, so I am preventing the behavior, can I start training now?

Yes, but first...

All this training advice is meant as a guideline.  Different dogs will progress at different rates due to temperament, history, environment, handler skill, and so forth.  It is very important to understand that RG takes a decent amount of time to "fix" with most dogs, and the training will have to be repeated, from the beginning, with all other family members to ensure the dog has generalized the behavior.  Patience is key.

Also, if your dog is breaking skin, you are otherwise afraid or intimidated by your dog, or you in any way feel you may be harmed (dog size is a factor to consider), then its time to hire a professional to help you.  Keep in mind, most trainers are not experienced in aggression cases and will not take them on.  Also be aware that many of the trainers that agree to take on aggression cases may not be truly qualified to do so.  Your best bet is to select your trainer very wisely or hire a good behaviorist, in either case, one who understands and practices Relationship Based Training.


Read About Relationship Based Training Tips from Suzanne Clothier:


Watch a Great Video about Relationship Based Training Tips by Zak George:




Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Wacky Wednesday!


Note: Click on the image to enlarge!
Wednesday is the day to be WACKY!  Each week we will showcase a terrierific Cairn picture with an appropriate caption.  If you would like us to consider YOUR picture and caption for an upcoming "Wacky Wednesday" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com!  All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.

A big shout out to Norway for being our Wacky Wednesday model this week!


Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Tuesday Tails: Hershey and Misha!

Note: Click on the image to enlarge!
Tuesday is full of Tails!  Each week we will showcase the Tail of one of our Col. Potter Rescued Cairns, either Post Adoption or still looking for that Forever Home while in a wonderful CP Foster Home.  If you have a great CP Post Adoption story (and photos!) and would like us to consider them for an upcoming "Tuesday Tails" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.).

Sunday, December 3, 2017

Sunday Sweets!

Sunday is full of SWEETS!  Each week we showcase the sweeter side of Cairns.  If you have a sweet filled Cairn and would like us to consider YOUR photo for an upcoming "Sunday Sweets!" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.).

Foster Juniper

Foster Carlotta

Leo fka Coffee Bean

Macie and Cindel

Foster Nessie

Ava fna CP Sequins

Foster Jib

Foster Carousel

Elish

Maggie fka Angelica (on right) and her sister Peyton

Foster Seth

Foster Bonita

Gracie fna CP Kayna

Sydney


Saturday, December 2, 2017

Still Time to Shop Lynch Creek Farm!

Please Feel Free to Cross Post!

Lynch Creek Farm is pleased to partner with Col. Potter again to bring you a special Fundraiser Campaign Col.Potter Cairn Rescue Network Giving Green!  Now through Sunday, December 10th, you can order any beautiful, high quality wreath, centerpiece, or other decorative item for the Holidays, as a Gift, or for your own home, and Lynch Creek Farm will donate a full 20% of your purchase to Col. Potter to help save another Cairn in need!  You can order now for December delivery, easy as 1.2.3!  Not ready to shop?  You can make a straight-up donation via the Lynch Creek Farm campaign and 100% of all donations will go to the Cairns!  100%!!!  A fantastic opportunity to donate or to give a gift that gives twice!

Lynch Creek Farm Presents
Now - December 10th
20% of all proceeds and 100% of all donations
during this time will be sent to

Check out some of our Sunday Sweets Favorites, featuring many Rescued Cairns and friends who have been helped by the generosity and hard work of so many Col. Potter Volunteers - the best gift in any season!



Please Feel Free to Cross Post!

 

 

Friday, December 1, 2017

Friday Flashback: Kody Celebrates His 1st Gotcha Year!

Written by Kody fka CP IC
Originally posted 11/24/2014 on the Post Adoption Blog

Kody fka CP IC, enjoying his 1st Gotcha Year!!
Hi there, it's me again, Kody!  Remember me?  When I was rescued by Col. Potter my name was “IC” and I was just a cute little puppy!  Mom and Dad officially adopted me the first week of December last year, but Mom told me my first truly significant “Gotcha Day” was November 8th.  She and Dad say that’s my special day since they went and picked me up that day!  At first I was a CP Foster, but Mom and Dad knew right away that I was already home! 

I know at times I can be a handful for Mom and Dad, but they’re OK with that!  Mom says I am a chewer… Guilty!  There is lots of evidence from my younger days to remind her, but well… I am still a puppy!  I am a highly skilled toy destroyer too, so Mom finally gave up on trying to find something I can't destroy.  Hehehehehe!

Dad and I love to play with the Teaser Pole!

Mom and Dad are pretty good at adapting, I have to say, so that’s what we all did. Now I get to play with something called a “teaser pole” that I think Dad invented.  Attached to this pole is a neat squeaker toy – without stuffing - and since my toy is tethered by a line, I can't take off and hide somewhere while I destroy it.   At first I thought “What?” but Dad knows how to make it so much fun for me to chase after it - and I usually do catch it!  I don’t mind now that it’s attached!  It’s much more fun to play with Dad!

Mom and Dad get a good laugh out of me zooming too!  They can't believe that after playing so hard with my teaser pole I have the energy to zoom around like a mad man!  I fly around the yard like a bullet, zoom through my pet door, fly around the living room, and back outside for more zooming!  I even have energy to zoom around and go flying through my hula hoop - which I really Love to do!

Look!  I can Fly!!

With all this fun, you might find it hard to believe that Mom has rules for me!   Rules!  I have to “Sit/Wait” to get out of my crate, to have my meals put down, and to go through doorways.  I am only allowed in the recliner when Mom or Dad are already sitting in it, but even then I have to wait for permission to jump up.  I try hard to respond to the “Hush” command, but you know how that can go sometimes…  Oh!  Then there is the “Leave it” command, and the famous “Off” command.  Good thing I’m smart enough to learn all these rules!

Mom thinks I would be a great dancer – at least that’s what she says!  I like to walk on two legs - and I have very good balance if I say so myself!  I love to try to jump up for attention, but Mom and Dad tell me I only get scratches with “four on the floor”. 

I have heard Mom and Dad say that compared to how I was when I first came to live with them, I am much better.  Well, of course!  Geesh!  Like I said, I was a cute little puppy!  They have high hopes, though, and think that by the time I’m five or so - hopefully - I will be mature!  Ha!!   I’m not so sure about it…

Wasn’t I a Cute little Puppy?

So, what do you think about how much I have grown?  Look at all that hair!!!  Good thing Mom is a professional groomer!  I usually get bathed, brushed and combed out every week because Mom likes me fuzzy - like a powder puff.  I have lots more hair than a Cairn so Mom and Dad are sure I have some other DNA mixed in there, but my personality is all Cairn all day long, and I’m really thankful that I got a chance to be rescued by the great Volunteers at Col. Potter Cairn Rescue Network.

Thank you for helping me celebrate my First Gotcha Year with my Forever Mom and Dad!!!
Read my First Christmas Story:
Read my First Post Adoption post:
Read my Intake story: