Sunday, July 31, 2011

CP foster Gruffyn, the 'Fierce' Lord


Itsy bitsy Mr. Gruffyn has joined the crazy crew here in OH.
Gruffyn actually means fierce lord but Gruffy is anything but!
He is a cute little bug although somewhat annoying in some
respects!! he got introduced to the other kids sooner than we
would normally have because we were desperately trying to get
him to poo for several days. Finally out with the other kids
Bunny peed and poohed and Gruffy copied her. ;)

Gruffy was taken to a shelter along with a big dog. Shelter
workers were told the big dog was aggressive but they put big
dog and Gruffy together. Big dog attacked little (12 lb.
sopping wet) Gruffy. Gruffy has a wound on the top of his head
and undernearth his chin. He also has lingering aftereffects of
pain which sometimes make him cry out when he's picked up. I'm
not sure Gruffy would have made it out of the shelter alive if
not for CP.

Gruffy does NOT like cottage cheese and "if you get that junk on
my kibble I won't eat it either" is his motto. ;) He's the
first picky kidlet we've had here in quite a while. I have to
stick all his tiny quarters and halves of medication inside a
bigger empty capsule. That is a HUGE help with this little
stinker. :)

If you look at the photos of his left side you'll see what
stunned my vet. She and I both say it's not thyroid related as
that would be at least somewhat symmetrical. It's not
malassezia as he doesn't smell 'yeasty' but he does have candida
in his ears. My vet said he looks as if his side were shaved
down and then he got terribly sunburned as the edges of the
damaged area are so regular. Why anyone would do that is beyond
me. He does have hair growing in.

Gruffy likes people and begs to be picked up and if not picked
up begs to be skritched. He likes the other dogs here. He has
loved the walks he's been on....but those are on hold due to the
high temps now.

He does NOT like getting his photo taken so I'm going to have to
become a stealth photographer....maybe I should ask for help
from celebrity journalists.....

Gruffy got two beautiful blankets from Auntie Pam Erickson this
morning. One for in his crate and the other for after he's been
bathed and the other blanket is in the wash. He will LOVE
these!!! He's definitely a cushiony-surface monger. LOL He's a
nice little old man (9 y/o) who deserves some good things to
happen to him for the first time in a long time.

Gruffyn is not yet available for adoption but he is being fostered in Ohio. You can learn about the cairns currently available for adoption by clicking here.

Sunday Sweets

Sunday is full of SWEETS! Each week we will showcase the sweeter side of Cairns. If you have a sweet filled cairn and would like us to consider YOUR picture for an upcoming "Sunday Sweets" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com! (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.)



Walker



Rocky & Gabby



Remmi (aka Remember)



Nicholas



Fortune


Duchess and Cali

Saturday, July 30, 2011

Paws and Pedals

Lowcountry Dog Magazine
by Leah Nicole Hawkins on Thursday, July 21st, 2011 at 9:18am


As we all learned from Roger in the 1996 release of 101 Dalmatians, sometimes tying your dog to the handlebars of your bicycle by its leash is not always a brilliant idea. While well-behaved dogs may be good to take on a refreshing bike ride, for the rest of us whose dogs tend to stop and sniff every tree or joyously lunge after just about anything that moves, having a dog tied to our bikes just doesn’t seem to work. However, there is hope for those who fall into the latter of the two categories. We compiled a list of products specifically designed to allow dogs to run beside their owner’s bikes in complete safety and comfort.

The WalkyDog Bike Leash is one such product. It is a metal rod that attaches to the bike just below the seat. The length of the rod allows the dog to run clear of the wheels and pedals of the bike, lessening the chances of injury to both the bike rider and the dog. The dog’s leash is connected to a patented spring within the rod that counterbalances the pull of the dog against the bike, allowing the rider to move with ease without having to account for the weight and movements of the canine. Although the length of the leash can be adjusted depending on the height of the dog, the product is recommended for dogs over a year old or at least twenty pounds. Leads can be extended up to twelve inches, however, if this is not enough, it is also possible to purchase a cord of a custom length or simply buy a cord at a hardware store. You can find this item online priced from $52 down to $39.95.

For large dogs with exceptionally powerful pulling ability, the Bike Tow Leash is sometimes a viable option. It performs the same function as the WalkyDog, but is specifically designed for dogs who would otherwise be a hazard to tie to a bicycle. The curved design of this leash absorbs the power of the dog, allowing the biker to ride in comfort. It can be found online for $150.

And don’t forget accessories! There is paw-pad protection wax and Ruff Wear Skyliner Dog Boots, shoes designed to allow dogs to cross abrasive, hot, or other potentially harmful surfaces in comfort. And don’t forget to bring along water! One neat product is the Gulpy Pet Water Dispenser. This convenient water dispenser has a clip, which allows it to be easily attached to the belt or pants, but is also the right size to fit in bicycle water bottle holders. An outer shell flips down to become a trough that holds water when the bottle is tipped upside down. The list price for this item is $15.

Of course, before using any of these items, it is important to make sure your dog is properly trained to run beside a bike. For this, it is important to first instill proper lead etiquette in your dog. Make sure that he or she behaves properly when walking normally on a leash. Your dog must know that they cannot pull away or run wherever they please when on the leash.

The first step in teaching your dog to run beside your bicycle is to introduce them to the bike itself. Roll it slowly toward him or her so that they can observe it and become familiar with it. If your dog shows any hostility toward your bike, stop them immediately. When your dog has become comfortable with the bike, leash the dog and have him stand on one side while you support the bike on the other. Begin walking slowly and continue until your dog is content.

The next step is to find a quiet place with minimal traffic and people. Throw a leg over the bike and continue walking with the bike between your legs. When you are confident that your dog is calm, sit down on the seat and begin to pedal gently. Try to keep the same pace as your dog has become used to it and a sudden increase in speed may make him or her nervous. After your dog becomes comfortable with you riding the bike, increase the pace as you see fit, though try to keep to low-traffic areas for the first few rides. You may also implement commands later in the training such as “stop” by saying the command and gently pulling on the leash while you slow down. Other commands such as “left” or “right” may also be helpful in ensuring that your dog stays clear of the wheels when you are turning. Lastly, remember to praise and encourage your dog when they perform well. This will reinforce their positive feelings in relation to the bike.

A bike ride is a good way to get exercise both for you and your dog, but remember that safety always comes first. If you take your dog out with you when you ride, be sure to have plenty of water for both of you and stay away from high-traffic areas where your dog may spook and put both him/her and you in danger. No matter how well trained a dog is, they can still be frightened by a loud noise or sudden appearance. Try to take your dog out in the morning or late afternoon when the temperature isn’t as hot. Use the proper equipment if you plan to have your dog run beside you on the bike and always remember that the key to success and safety in that situation is for you to maintain a calm, positive attitude.

Some of these products (or ones like them) can be found locally in outdoor shops such as Half Moon Outfitters, The Outdoor Shoppe and The Bicycle Shoppe.

Friday, July 29, 2011

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Heat Exhaustion in Dogs - Signs to look for and How to Prevent it


The following is a “pass along” newsletter article from the Pointing Dog Journal.

Pass Along PDJ Heat Exhaustion
By Jill Swan

Now that summer is upon us, things are heating up, which can cause our sporting dogs to overheat during training if precautions are not taken. Keeping your dog cool and watching for signs of heat exhaustion — after all, they have a difficult time holding back and saying no — are just as important as the lessons you’re teaching during your outdoor sessions. Heat exhaustion, simply put, is when the body gets overheated from working (exercising) in hot, humid temperatures. To gain better insight, we’ll rely on the expertise of veterinary associates Drs. Peter Lotsikas and Chris Zink of Veterinary Orthoperdic & Sports Medicine Group in Annapolis Junction, Maryland.

What are some of the signs?

Humans regulate their body temperature primarily through the skin, such as sweating. But “dogs do not sweat like humans, and the majority of their cooling ability comes from the respiratory system,” says Drs. Peter Lotsikas and Chris Zink. “Dogs will initially start to pant and salivate when they become hot. The evaporation of the saliva from their tongue, mouth, and throat removes heat from the body.”

What can I do to help prevent heat exhaustion?

Coat and coat care — The thickness of your dog’s coat is also something to consider as dogs do use their skin for heat exchange. According to our docs, “A dog’s fur traps air, just like birds, which acts as an insulator when it is cold as well as when it is hot outside. This allows dilated blood vessels to exchange heat with the ‘trapped’ cooler air in the fur. A dog’s ability to trap insulating air will differ based on breed type and coat characteristics. Short haired breeds do not have the ability to trap air within their coat, thus these breeds are more susceptible to overheating than are double coated breeds like retrievers. Keeping short haired dogs wet during training and heavy exercise is an effective way to keep them cool. As the water evaporates, heat is removed with it.

“For a double coated or long single coated breed, you are better off only wetting the groin and abdominal areas, where the skin is thin and poorly haired, to allow for heat excha nge. Wetting the back of these dogs actually traps water in the coat, and as this trapped water begins to vaporize it will increase the humidity around the skin, actually making the dog hotter.” To better help the trapping of air, keep your dog’s coat well-groomed and clean.
Physical shape — And of course, make certain that your dog is in good training condition. Dogs not used to heavy training or working on a regular basis outside will be effected more quickly. “A conditioned dog’s temperature should regulate to normal (99.5-102.5) within twenty minutes of cooling. Any temperature of above 105 persisting longer than thirty minutes following appropriate cooling requires the attention of a veterinary professional.”
Water — Make sure to offer your dog plenty of cool water intermittently during your training sessions, and make sure he drinks some. “Remember that dogs do not need to drink large amounts of water in hot weather as we do, because they do not become dehydrated from sweating. Many dogs do not drink substantial amounts on performance days and it is not a problem,” says Drs. Peter Lotsikas and Chris Zink. The important thing is that the coolness of the liquid will cool down the core body temperature of the dog.

What can I do if my dog becomes overheated?

Hopefully the situation never escalates to that level, but if you are seeing signs that your dog is overheated, then you need to immerse the dog in cool water. Don’t use ice water because it constricts the blood vessels and can actually increase the dog’s core body temperature. “If water is limited, then you are best to apply the water directly to the belly, armpits, and groin,” advises Drs. Peter Lotsikas and Chris Zink. They also recommend rubbing alcohol: “It can be applied to their paw pads, external ear flaps, and abdomen, as it evaporates quickly and is an effective method of exchanging heat.”

Doctor Bios
Dr. Peter Lotsikas, DVM is an ACVS board-certified surgeon with the Veterinary Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Group (VOSM) in Annapolis Junction, Maryland. Dr. Lotsikas specializes in orthopedic injuries of the performance dog. His clinical focus is on minimally invasive surgery (arthroscopy) and joint preservation.

Dr. M. Christine Zink DVM, Ph.D, DACVP is a canine sports medicine trainer affiliated with VOSM. Her expertise is in evaluating canine locomotion and designing individualized retraining and conditioning programs for the canine athlete.

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Welcome Bradshaw

Written by a CP Intakes volunteer



Please help welcome CP's Bradshaw.

This boy was found as a stray, and when the Owner was located, she decided it was in his best interest to relinquish him. That was his lucky break! He was covered in fleas and suffering skin issues of yeast and bacteria with flea dermatitis thrown in for good measure. He was treated at the vet, brought up to date on his medical care, while an adoptive home was sought. After weeks with no luck finding a great home, the vet reached out to Col. Potter.

Bradshaw is 6 years old, and reported to be a very sweet boy. He is going to be a wonderful addition to a lucky family!

Wacky Wednesday!


Wednesday is the day to be WACKY! Each week we will showcase a terrierific cairn picture with an appropriate caption. If you have a terrierific cairn and would like us to consider YOUR picture and caption for an upcoming "Wacky Wednesday" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com! (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.)

A big shout out to Ozzie, for being our Wacky Wednesday model this week!

Monday, July 25, 2011

Introducing Hogan

Written by a CP Intakes volunteer


Hogan lived with the same family since he was a puppy. They were moving and the pet deposit was too high; they dumped him off at a high kill dog pound. He is 10 years old.

Hogan is a sweetheart, he is housetrained and understands 'sit', 'come', 'stay', and 'no'. He loves to fetch, and he gets along well with other animals. The shelter knew that hearing "10 years old" scares away adopters, but they also knew being cairn he had many good years left. Col. Potter jumped in to make sure Hogan had them to live.

Welcome, Hogan!

Sunday, July 24, 2011

ANOTHER BABY SAFE THANKS TO COL. POTTER!

Written by CP's VP of Intakes



Imagine being a puppy, lost and alone, found wandering the streets, no collar, no microchip. A good Samaritan picked him up, but couldn't keep him and passed him along to someone else, who passed him along to someone else ... this scenario repeated itself FOUR times in FOUR days until the last person was headed to Miami-Dade Shelter with him. Anyone that knows anything about shelters, knows Miami-Dade is NOT a shelter any animal wants to find itself in--they euthanize 70+ dogs a day.

Luckily a local small rescue stepped in and saved him from heading to Miami-Dade, but they were full and could not keep him long. They didn't have to keep him long, just long enough to get in touch with Col. Potter which opened its arms to cradle this baby in love.

Please help me welcome Clean Slate, a little black brindle boy estimated to be 10-12 months old. His name is from our Name a Cairn program and was donated by Amy H. in honor of Magic Slate (aka Slater) who lost his battle following liver shunt surgery and the new start all the furkids get when they come to Col. Potter.

Something tells me that a little boy named Slater had a paw at guiding this baby to Col. Potter and because of his efforts, Clean Slate will now have the happily ever after that was taken away from Slater. Welcome Clean Slate!!

Sunday Sweets

Sunday is full of SWEETS! Each week we will showcase the sweeter side of Cairns. If you have a sweet filled cairn and would like us to consider YOUR picture for an upcoming "Sunday Sweets" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com! (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.)


Tootsie


Remy


Pablo & Abby


Kea


Abbie

Ben

Saturday, July 23, 2011

Dog Left in Hot Car Rescued by Police

myfoxphoenix.com




Updated: Thursday, 14 Jul 2011, 12:59 PM MST
Published : Thursday, 14 Jul 2011, 12:56 PM MST



PHOENIX - You can't leave anything precious locked inside of a car this time of year, because temperatures can climb as high as 140 degrees.

But just a few days ago, someone wasn't thinking and left a puppy inside a car.

The dog would have died if it wasn’t for two Phoenix police officers.

FOX 10’s Diane Ryan has their story and the story of "Skip,” the dog.

Tips on Dogs and Heat From: mydogiscool.com

• Dogs are especially vulnerable to heat-related illness, because they can only cool off by panting and through the pads in their feet.

• Enclosed cars heat up quickly. In a study by San Francisco State University, when it was 80 degrees outside, the temperature inside a car rose to 99 degrees in 10 minutes and 109 degrees in 20 minutes.

• A dog's normal body temperature is between 101 to 102.5 degrees; a dog can only withstand a high body temperature for a short time before suffering nerve damage, heart problems, liver damage, brain damage or even death.

• Studies show that cracking the windows has little effect on a car's internal temperature.


Note from CP Blogger: Please leave your dog at home in the summer. If you see a dog left in a hot car, call 911 and alert the authorities.

Friday, July 22, 2011

Taming Tip from Taming the Wild Side Dog Training

Contributed by Terri Elkins, Owner / Trainer -




Note from from CP Blogger: We would like to thank Terri Elkins for allowing us to post her weekly taming tips on our blog. Her training facility is located in Fort Worth, Texas.


Each week we'll share a Taming Tip for you, your family and friends to do with your dog(s)! These tips will help teach your dog real world manners in a fun way. Leave us a comment and tell us how it went!

Taming Tip #17:

Primp and pamper your dog for a day by giving him / her a massage and brushing their coat. Have your treats ready and if your dog has areas where he doesn't like to be touched like his paws, ears, tail and / or tummy give him small pieces of higher value rewards such as cheese or chicken when you brush or massage those areas. Have fun and enjoy your spa day with your dog

Please follow this link to visit their blog!

Friday's Funnies!

Raising Duncan

by Chris Browne

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Please welcome Jilly!

Written by a CP Intakes volunteer



Sometimes owners spend money and more money on their dogs, and still a problem is unsolved. This is what happened to this precious 7 year old gray brindle Jilly. Due to the economy, her owner could no longer afford proper medical attention and felt that Jilly would be better off with someone who can give her the medical care that she needs.

Jilly should be in her foster home shortly. Let's all give a warm welcome with open arms to this sweet girl.

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

SO CLOSE TO DEATH'S DOOR ... THEN CP STEPPED IN!

Written by CP's VP of Intakes



Imagine having a nasty skin condition that didn't allow you to have surgery to save your life, so you were sentenced to death.

Now you say that doesn't really happen ... or does it?

The answer pretty much depends on if you are a human or you are a little female Cairn picked up as a stray and sent to a small rural shelter. The shelter has to follow their policy that all dogs must be spayed or neutered before even making it to the adoption floor. This little girl came in with a skin condition and when she was sent to the vet to have her skin checked and spayed, the vet advised her skin would have to be treated and her immune system regenerated before she could be spayed. This small, rural shelter doesn't have the time or the money to hold an animal for an extended period of time to receive such treatment. And so, she was sent back to the shelter that afternoon and put on the euthanasia list for the following morning.

Luckily Col. Potter's timing was good and with many back and forth after hours phone calls to the treating vet and shelter representatives we were able to engineer a stay of execution for this little girl. The following day the phone calls resumed as some of the cast of players had changed and we didn't rest until we had confirmation that she had been transported back to the vet and was now officially a CP kid and receiving the treatment she needs.

The treating vet believes in addition to yeast and bacteria infections on her skin, she may have sarcoptic mange, so she is being treated for both the infections and mange. Her spay surgery and dental will have to wait several weeks or even months until her immune system is stronger and she is healthier. Because of the mange, she will be boarded at the vet until she is healthy enough to move to a foster home. All of this means her vetting bill will be sizeable, but when you take one look at her face, I think you will agree that she deserves this chance at a happily ever after. Please consider making a donation to help with her vetting costs.

I am very pleased to introduce Celeste, estimated at 7-8 years old, we believe she is a wheaten brindle but hard to tell because of the hair loss and condition of her skin. She is a sweet, friendly little girl. She is named after the shelter rescue volunteer who endeavored to move heaven and earth to keep her alive and find Col. Potter to help her.

Celeste will need to be kept separated from any other resident furkids for a little while after her arrival and will need to continue with her meds and baths to help her skin heal and hair regrow to transform her into the beautiful little Cairn Princess that is hiding underneath. CP's Medical Team will be there to work with you every step of the way



Thanks for your support of Col. Potter. Without it we would not have been able to save Celeste from death's door ...

Wacky Wednesday!


Wednesday is the day to be WACKY! Each week we will showcase a terrierific cairn picture with an appropriate caption. If you have a terrierific cairn and would like us to consider YOUR picture and caption for an upcoming "Wacky Wednesday" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com! (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.)

A big shout out to Rocky, for being our Wacky Wednesday model this week!

Monday, July 18, 2011

Top Summer Traumas for Pets and how to Weather Them


Home Again Newsletter

There are so many things to love about summer. Parades down Main Street, fireworks filling the night sky and camping beneath the stars, just to name a few. But while these warm-weather attractions might be fun for us humans, they can be frightening and even dangerous for pets. Here are a few tips on how to help your pet enjoy summertime festivities as much as you do.

Things that go BANG!

Fireworks can be so upsetting for pets that more dogs and cats run away from home on the 4th of July than any other holiday. It’s one of the most important times of year to make sure your pet is safe and secure. The Associated Humane Society offers these recommendations for helping Fido or Fluffy stay put during fireworks celebrations:

Take your pet out for a walk before fireworks begin to exercise, relax and go “potty.”
Keep him inside during fireworks with the windows securely closed. He may even feel most comfortable in a small interior room. Be sure to remove any items that your pet could destroy, or that would be harmful if chewed or ingested.

Make sure your pet is microchipped and that your information is up to date.

If your pet is extremely sensitive to loud noises, talk to your vet before the holiday weekend. He or she will offer ways to help alleviate your pet’s fear and anxiety.

Stormy weather

Summertime is thunderstorm seaso
n. For sensitive pets, storms can be terrifying. Whether they are scared of the light, the noise, the smells, or even the change in barometric pressure, a storm can set off a series of behaviors that can be dangerous for your phobic pet. Some pets may shake, drool, howl, bark and even lose bladder and bowel control.

Teach Fluffy that storms don’t have to be scary. Move her to a windowless room or a basement where her exposure to the storm will be reduced, or distract her by playing a game with one of her favorite toys. You can even reserve special toys or treats for use only during a storm, so that your pet associates the frightening stimulus with a positive behavior. If thunder is the biggest issue, you could also consider investing in a white noise machine or turning on a bathroom fan to drown out some of the boom.

Tent city

There’s no better time to dust off your camping gear, set out for the wilderness and sleep beneath the stars. But while the Great Outdoors may seem like an ideal vacation destination for Fido, remember that he will also be exposed to new and unfamiliar territory. Here are a few tips to make camping more fun for everyone:

Purchase a pet first aid kit from a pet supply store. Even something as small as a bug bite or splinter can make for a very unhappy pooch if untreated.

Bring the right food for Fido. While campfire fare might seem like a fun treat for your pets, ingestion of fatty foods can cause pancreatitis and other digestive issues, which even a first aid kit won’t cure. Best bet, bring along his favorite pet food and keep the s’mores to yourself.

Respect your pet’s physical limitations. Domesticated animals may seem like they simply can’t wait to “run wild,” but they can get as out of shape as the rest of us. So don’t expect Fido to climb a mountain, hike miles of trails or swim across the entire lake.

The best part of summer is spending time having fun with you pets. By thinking ahead, you can make sure that whatever you do this season, everyone has a great time—Fido and Fluffy included.

Sunday, July 17, 2011

Be careful when wetting down a double coated dog!


Contributed by a CP Volunteer

In this high heat and humidity-a reminder yet again on wet dog coats

Since a whole lot of us will have exceptionally high heat and humidity all week...this bears repeating and --if you are going to wet your dog down, MAKE SURE to wet down BOTH layers of coat...both the outer coat and the one next to the skin. if you don't, you are trapping the heat next to the body with the much heavier,wet outer coat and the dog will be even hotter...and keep those footpads cool with water...


Follow this link for more information

For a double coated or long single coated breed, you are better off only wetting the groin and abdominal areas, where the skin is thin and poorly haired, to allow for heat exchange. Wetting the back of these dogs actually traps water in the coat, and as this trapped water begins to vaporize it will increase the humidity around the skin, actually making the dog hotter.” To better help the trapping of air, keep your dog s coat well-groomed and clean.

Blinking LED lights for your dogs are Buy One get one free from CP until Monday

Contributed by a CP Volunteer

follow this link and if you order one before Monday, you will get two!


well, summer heat WILL end.

days will get shorter and nights will be longer and furkids will be on walks and potty time in the dark

nifty thing to keep track of them, esp. the precious dark brindle kids

an LED tag on their collars (Kim Kommando listed them on her newsletter this morning)

Keep Your Pets Safe!
With our blinking LED light


Guardian Gear Flashing Pawprint Shaped ID Tags (Collar Light)

Guardian Gear Flashing Pawprint shaped ID Tags are perfect to help keep your pet safe at night. Great for jogging, night walks, camping or just letting you know where your pet is when he she goes outside. These lights fit virtually any collar

Sized for small-medium breeds or large breed pets
Pets are family too, keep them visible, keep them safe!

Sunday Sweets

Sunday is full of SWEETS! Each week we will showcase the sweeter side of Cairns. If you have a sweet filled cairn and would like us to consider YOUR picture for an upcoming "Sunday Sweets" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com! (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.)

Remy

Hilts

Halle (fka Bianca)

Bunny

Joey

Saturday, July 16, 2011

Mason on the Mend, Update on Terrier Tornado Survivor

Life with Dogs


Two months after making a miraculous, painful journey home, a famous tornado survivor grows stronger.

2 plates and seventeen screws were required to put Mason’s badly broken legs back together. The stoic dog made an arduous cross-country trip to find his way home after being blown away by a tornado April 27th.

To see him when he first returned, his front legs flopping from distal radial ulnar fractures, one would be hard pressed to believe that he would heal soon, but the prognosis is actually quite good: Mason will be released after just five weeks of rehab.

If you’re one of those who fretted the details in our first report, do not despair. Morgan’s family originally believed that they would be homeless when Mason was released and were prepared to relinquish him if it were in his best interest. In a turn of good fortune they’ve learned that their home will be livable soon, and they’ll be waiting with open arms when he’s ready to return.

Friday, July 15, 2011

Welcome GRUFFYN to the CP Family!!

Written by a CP Intakes volunteer



Gruffyn means "fierce lord"! Well, this 9 year old, 12 lb. cairn boy is all but fierce. He is said to be quiet, lazy, affectionate and likes his soft squeaky toys. He was an owner surrender to a shelter, he was surrender with another large dog and the shelter normally puts them in the same kennel when they come in together. Well, this did not work out well for Gruffyn as the other dog attached him and left some wounds to his head. He was taken to the vets for treatment and as luck would have it we were able to step in before he needed to go back to the shelter and so he came to Col. Potter. He also has some skin issues which he was started on medication for (you can see in the pictures that he has fur missing). They also have him on grain free food, no corn or wheat for this boy!

He will soon be on his way to his foster mom that will get him all healthy and ready for his forever home. He will soon be living the good life he deserves.

Thanks to all the volunteers that helped get Gruffyn into CP!

Friday's Funnies!

Raising Duncan
by Chris Browne

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Exercising your dog in Summer Heat


Lowcountry Dog Magazine
by DanielIslandVet on Tuesday, July 12th, 2011 at 11:55pm

Your four-legged friend jogs in a fur coat

Charleston is a wonderful location for pet owners, and dogs make great exercise companions for our trails and beaches, but now that we are in another Lowcountry summer, caution is indicated.

Heat and humidity add to the workload for the heart, lungs, and cooling system of the body. Dogs do not sweat like humans, so their body temperatures rise more quickly with exertion. Panting and water consumption are their two most effective methods for keeping hyperthermia in check, and neither one is especially efficient.

Pavement can burn footpads


Dogs walked to our facility for appointments on cool, cloudy days often have body temperatures elevated as much as three degrees. Adding mid-day sunshine, high humidity, or a faster pace puts your pet at risk for serious health problems. The best time to exercise your pet is before 10:00 AM or after 6:00 PM.

Just as you would condition yourself before tackling a six mile run, dogs need to start with shorter jaunts and build up to longer outings. Never force your pet to go farther than he wants, if he is stopping under every shade tree or lagging behind you, it is time to slow to a walk and head home to the air conditioning.

Help for Heat Stress

If you think your pet is over-heating, wet the hair coat and allow your dog to drink fresh water and to rest in a cool place. Panting should begin to ease within a few minutes. Bright red gums and weakness are signs your pet needs help from a veterinarian.

Body temperatures over 108 degrees Fahrenheit can quickly cause permanent damage to the brain, bowel, and other vital structures. Once that high, the body is unable to get it back under control without medical intervention.

Have fun in the sun safely


Not all dogs will let you know when they feel tired, so don’t depend on your canine companion to complain. Working breed dogs live to please their humans, and they’ll literally run, hunt, or retrieve themselves to death. Remember to exercise the responsibility that comes with pet ownership, as you exercise your buddy. He depends upon you.

Adding mid-day sunshine, high humidity, or a faster pace puts your pet at risk for serious health problems
.


Daniel Island Animal Hospital is a small animal veterinary clinic located in Charleston, SC on Daniel Island. They focus on general medicine and wellness including surgery, dentistry, radiology, and emergency care for dogs, cats, and small mammals. Teri Macklin, of Island Dog Cuts, provides grooming for dogs and cats in the facility. Their team is dedicated to personalized patient care and friendly client service.


ANOTHER CAIRN ASKS "WHAT DID I DO WRONG THAT YOU DON'T WANT ME ANYMORE?"

Written by CP's VP of Intakes



Summertime and the livin' is easy...or so the song says. In reality, the lyrics could be changed to "Summertime and the dumpin' is easy". Shelters have peak times of the year when more animals are surrendered than at other times. Two of the peak times are summer and year-end holidays. Why these two particular times you may ask? It's just easiest to dump a pet at the shelter while they go on vacation and tell themselves someone else will give them a better home than they ever could.

Unfortunately, that's not what happens. Shelters only have room for so many animals, there are only so many adopters available, and rescues can only take so many from the shelters to help with the overcrowding. You know what happens to the rest...

One little cairn boy found himself in such a situation. His family, the only one he had ever known for his two years on this earth, decided "they didn't have time for him anymore". He had been an only dog, never crate trained and now found himself in a shelter, alone, afraid and wondering "What did I do wrong that my family doesn't want me anymore?" He didn't do well at the shelter, all noises and being caged added to his fear and made him withdraw. He didn't greet prospective adopters but hung at the back of his crate. When he was taken out, he resisted going back into his crate and he was deemed to suffer from separation anxiety. The shelter decided that he was not adoptable. You know what happens to those that are not adoptable.

All because his family didn't have time for him anymore. Or, at least that's what they said, when they left him there at the shelter, never looking back at him and his frightened, confused, pleading eyes begging them to come back.

This little one got lucky. This little one found Col. Potter. Maybe his family didn't want him anymore, maybe they didn't have time for him anymore, maybe they're enjoying a vacation somewhere. Col. Potter has the time for him, Col. Potter wants him and thanks to Col. Potter his journey to a happily ever after has begun!

Please help me welcome Brisket, a very handsome little man who will never again have to ask the question "What did I do so wrong that you don't want me anymore?"

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Wacky Wednesday!


Wednesday is the day to be WACKY! Each week we will showcase a terrierific cairn picture with an appropriate caption. If you have a terrierific cairn and would like us to consider YOUR picture and caption for an upcoming "Wacky Wednesday" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com! (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.)

A big shout out to Kayla and Sadie, for being our Wacky Wednesday models this week!

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

CP dogs in the news: Moose the intuitive

Contributed by Moose's adoptive mom

Huntington Quarterly Top Dogs


Most Intuitive: Moose

Moose, an 11-year-old Cairn Terrier belonging to Marla and David Tolley, is a little guy with a big personality. He shares the Tolley home, albeit begrudgingly, with his younger sidekick Kerwin, a dark gray dog of the same breed.

“Cairn Terriers are scruffy, earth-loving, alert and intelligent,” Marla says. “These are not lap dogs or a dog to stuff in a purse and look pretty – these dogs live to dig, chase, sniff, hunt and play. They are tenacious and stubborn and rowdy, and they have such an independent spirit.”

But it’s not just Moose’s strong will and funny personality that earned him a spot on our list. Marla says that even before he was officially hers, she knew there was something special about him. Passed around in various foster homes after his elderly owners had to give him up, Moose was rescued by the Tolley family when he was 9 years old – and he brought with him a unique gift.

“Moose used to repeatedly nudge a spot on his owner’s leg with his nose,” Marla says. “When it was checked by a physician, she found out it was advanced melanoma. Then, later on, Moose began nudging her husband’s stomach in the same way, and a colonoscopy revealed that he had a polyp on his colon. Moose was also a tattletale pool alarm; if a child ventured too close to the pool during family cookouts, he would faithfully sound his alarm.”

After settling into his new home with Marla and David, Moose’s strange behavior around a female visitor led to an early announcement from the family friend that she was pregnant. He followed her from room to room, sitting at her feet as soon as she sat down, as if he were protecting both her and her future child.

“Compassion is definitely there,” Marla says. “He really does have an understanding of people’s unspoken needs and hurts. On the other hand, he can be the most stubborn, bull-headed thing you’ve ever seen. He’s an old man now, and he’s been down a rough road, moving around from house to house. But he lives the comfortable life now. He knows where he fits in our home.”

Note from CP Blogger: Moose went home with Marla and Dave from the WV CRAP (Cairn Rescue Annual Party) in 2009. She submitted his story for consideration in the Huntington WV Quarterly Top Dogs feature and he is one of the featured dogs! You can click the link above to see all of the dogs included.


Monday, July 11, 2011

Please Welcome Sona

Written by a CP Intakes volunteer



Sona (meaning “happy” in Irish-Gaelic) is a 5 year old owner surrender. Hers is the typical story we hear so often--the owner has a very busy life and doesn’t have the time to devote to her. One of our Col. Potter foster homes saw Sona advertised for “Free” and contacted the Intakes Team to see if we could get her before she ended up in the wrong hands. Fortunately, she also offered to foster Sona--so she’s a CP girl now.

Early reports from her foster mom are that she’s very friendly, happy and one of the smartest cairns she’s ever met.

Welcome to Col Potter, happy little girl! We’ll find you a wonderful new home.

Sunday, July 10, 2011

Taming Tip from Taming the Wild Side Dog Training

Contributed by Terri Elkins, Owner / Trainer -




Note from from CP Blogger: We would like to thank Terri Elkins for allowing us to post her weekly taming tips on our blog. Her training facility is located in Fort Worth, Texas.


Each week we'll share a Taming Tip for you, your family and friends to do with your dog(s)! These tips will help teach your dog real world manners in a fun way. Leave us a comment and tell us how it went!


Taming Tip #16:

Want to polish off your down-stay? Take your dog to the busiest room of the house and ask your dog to down-stay, while your family / friends are walking around the room or while there are other distractions present such as people snacking on food, kids playing, etc. To help keep your dog in position, click and treat every few seconds. Practice this often, maybe once in the morning and once in the evening. Remember to keep your training short, we suggest 5 minutes and under.

Please follow this link to visit their blog!

Sunday Sweets

Sunday is full of SWEETS! Each week we will showcase the sweeter side of Cairns. If you have a sweet filled cairn and would like us to consider YOUR picture for an upcoming "Sunday Sweets" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com! (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.)

Bea, Neha and Zander

Riley

Maisie Mae

Moose

Kerwin

Kayla and Sadie